Organic Learning Hub

The home for all organic resources and publications that the UW Organic Collaborative creates

We’re always growing our resource database of original, UW-generated materials. If you’re looking for more comprehensive, curated resource lists beyond our own, there are some great compilations out there (organic grain, dairy, vegetable production, etc.). If you’re just looking for peer-reviewed journal articles, click the big red button below. Let us know if you’d like to see something that’s not here – agurda@wisc.edu. Happy perusing!

Certification and Transition

Consumer Science

Cover Crops

Dairy Science

Education and Training

Entomology

Farmers Markets

Fertility

Field Crops

Financial

Fruit and Nut Crops

Livestock

Marketing

No-till

Plant Breeding

Plant Pathology

Regional Food Systems

Reports

Soil Health

Urban Farming

UW Meetings and Events

Variety Trials

Vegetable Crops

Weed Control

Resource Roulette!

Check out a sample of some of the videos, publications, tools, etc. that we’ve made for you over the years.

Certification and Transition

Academic Articles

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Consumer Science

Academic Articles
  • Silva, E.M., J. Klink, E. McKinney, J. Price, P. Deming, H. Rivedal, and J. Colquhoun. 2019. Attitudes of university campus dining customers towards sustainability-related food values. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems. Firstview 1-6.
  • Costa, S., Zepeda, L., and Sirieix, L. 2014. “Exploring the social value of organic food: A qualitative study in France” International Journal of Consumer Studies(38) no 3, 228-237. Published on line http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ijcs.12100/abstract
  • Zepeda, L., Sirieix, L., Pizarro, A., Corderre, F. and Rodine, F. “A conceptual framework for analyzing consumers’ food label preferences: An exploratory study of sustainability labels in France,Quebec, Spain and the US” International Journal of Consumer Studies(37) no 6, 605-616. Published on line July 19, 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ijcs.12041/abstract
  • Zepeda, L. and Nie, C. “What are the odds of buying organic or local foods? Multivariate analysis of US food shopper lifestyle segments” Agricultural and Human Values. (29), no. 4, 2012: 467-480
  • Nie, C. and L. Zepeda.“Lifestyle segmentation of US food shoppers to examine organic and local food consumption”Appetite. (57), 2011: 28-37.
  • Zepeda, L. and D. Deal. “Organic and local food consumer behavior: Alphabet Theory” International Journal of Consumer Studies. September (33), no 5, 2009: 697-705. (downloaded over 700 times from IJCSin 2010).
  • Li, J., L. Zepeda, and B. Gould. “The demand for organic food in the US: An empirical assessment” Journal of Food Distribution Research. November (38) no 3, 2007:54-69.
  • Zepeda, L. and J. Li. “Characteristics of Organic Food Shoppers” Journal of Agriculture and Applied EconomicsApril (39) no 1, 2007:17-28.
  • Zepeda, L. H.S. Chang and C. Leviten-Reid “Organic Food Demand: A Focus Group Study Involving Caucasian and African-American Shoppers” Agriculture and Human Values, Fall (23) no. 3, 2006: 385-394. http://www.springerlink.com/content/t736437303u84427/
  • Chang, H.S. and L. Zepeda. “Consumer Perceptions and Demand for Organic Food in Australia: Focus Group Discussions” Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems.(20) no 3, 2005:155-167.[A version of the paper “Demand for Organic Food in Australia: Results froma Focus-Group Study” was presented by Chang at the 2004 FDRS Conference, Moro Bay, CA, 10-13 October 2004. The abstract was published as part of the proceedings in the Journal of Food Distribution Research(36) no. 1, 2005.]
  • *Zepeda, L. “The US Organic Shopper” Proceedings, 16th IFOAM Organic World Conference, Modena, Italy, June 17-20, 2008
  • Silva, E.M., F. Dong, P.D. Mitchell, and J. Hendrickson. 2014. Impact of marketing channels on perceptions of quality of life and profitability of Wisconsin’s organic vegetable farmers. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems. 30:428-438.
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Cover Crops

Academic Articles
  • Silva, E.M. 2014. Management of five fall-sown cover crops for organic no-till production in the Upper Midwest. Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems. 38:748-763.
  • Silva, E.M. and L. Vereecke. 2019. Optimizing organic cover crop-based rotational tillage systems for early soybean growth. Organic Agriculture. Firstview 1-11.
  • Silva, E.M. and K. Delate. 2017. A decade of progress in organic cover crop-based reduced tillage practices in the Upper Midwestern USA. Agriculture. 7:44.
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  • Soybeans and Spring Planted Rye OGRAIN Fact Sheet 20-2  (2020, 5 page PDF)
    • Research from Arlington Research Station on interseeding spring planted cereal rye into soybeans. Authored by Léa Vereecke, UW Madison Research Specialist.
  • Cover crops on the intensive market farm
    • This updated publication is meant to serve as a practical guide to using cover crops on small- to moderate-size fresh market vegetable operations. Cover crops are especially vital on organic vegetable farms. Organic growers rely on cover crops to build organic matter in the soil, provide nutrients to subsequent cash crops, help reduce weed pressure, and manage other pests. The recommendations in this report are appropriate for a certified organic grower.
  • Fall-sown cover crops and weed suppression in organic small-scale vegetable production (CIAS research brief #99)   
    • A technique to control weeds with cover crops called Cover crop-based reduced tillage (CCBRT) is gaining traction on organic row crop farms. Could this technique work on small, organic diversified vegetable farms? A team of UW-Madison researchers undertook a two-year study to evaluate weed suppression, manual labor requirements and crop yield and quality under a CCBRT system in organic vegetable plantings. They found that cover crop mulch was effective in early season weed control but less so later in the season, and manual weeding time required in the cover crop treatment was not less than in the cultivated plots. Vegetable yields and quality varied by treatment, crop and year.
  • Cover crops case studies: JenEhr Family Farm
    • This case study presents the experience of a Wisconsin vegetable grower who has been growing cover crops for more than ten years. He describes his philosophy of cover crop use and offers his perspectives on what cover crop strategies have and have not worked on his farm, what benefits he receives from growing cover crops and how he manages these crops. Farmers and researchers can use this information as a starting point to explore how they might develop cover crop systems to fit their situations and meet their own goals.
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Dairy Science

Academic Articles
  • Liang, D., F. Sun, M. Wattiaux, V. Cabrera, J. Hedtcke, and E.M. Silva.  2017. Effect of feeding strategies and cropping systems on greenhouse gases emission from Wisconsin certified organic dairy farms. Journal of Dairy Science. 7:5957-5973.
  • Zegler, C.H., M.J. Renz, G.E. Brink, and M.D. Ruark. 2020. Assessing the importance of plant, soil, and management factors affecting potential milk production on organic pastures using regression tree analysis. Agric. Syst.180:102776.
  • Kim, D., Stoddart, C.A. Rotz, K. Veltman, L. Chase, J. Cooper, P. Ingraham, R.C. Izaurralde, C.D. Jones, R.G. Gaillard, H.A. Aguirre-Villegas, R.A. Larson, M.D. Ruark, W. Salas, O. Jolliet, G.J. Thoma. 2019. Analysis of beneficial management practices to mitigate environmental impacts in dairy production systems around the Great Lakes. Agricult.Syst. 176:102660.
  • Brock, Caroline and Bradford Barham, “Amish Dedication to Farming and Adoption of Organic Dairy Systems,” in Environmental, Agricultural and Food Ethics. ed. Jim Bingen et 3al. Kluwer Series, (2015).
  • Caroline Brock and Bradford L. Barham, “’Milk is Milk: Organic Dairy AdoptionDecisions and Bounded Rationality”, Sustainability, 5, 12 (2013): 5416-5441; doi:10.3390/su5125416
  • Caroline Brock and Bradford L. Barham, “Farm Structural Change of a Different Kind: Alternative Dairy Farms in Wisconsin – Graziers, Organic, and Amish,” Renewable Agriculture, 24, 1 (2009):25-37.
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  • Organic Dairy Farms in Wisconsin: Prosperous, Modern, and Expansive
    • Organic dairy farming in Wisconsin is experiencing rapid growth and capturing an increased share of the market. Although the organic dairy sector in Wisconsin is still relatively small, accounting for two percent of the state’s cows, Wisconsin is one of the nation’s top two producers of organic dairy products and home to the largest organic milk cooperative. The expectation of strong demand growth for organic milk products provides plenty of potential for continued expansion in organic dairy farming within the state. Yet, relatively little is known about how organic farms compare with other types of dairy operations in terms of the demographic characteristics of the farmers, size and structure of the farms, management practices and technologies utilized, their overall economic performance, and quality of life experiences.This report fills that knowledge gap by offering the first comprehensive, descriptive picture oforganic dairy farming in Wisconsin. It compares the results of a survey of organic dairy farmers in Wisconsin with a similar statewide sample of conventional and Management Intensive Rotational Grazing (MIRG) dairy farms. Data utilized in this report were collected by the UW-Program on Agricultural Technology studies from Wisconsin dairy farmers (Winter, 2003) and organic dairy farmers (Spring, 2004). 
  • How does organic management on dairy farms affect pastures and soils?
    • Organic dairy farming is an important part of Wisconsin agriculture. Productive pastures play a critical role in supporting organic dairy farms because pasture is a required feed source for organic cattle in the U.S. The USDA Pasture Rule requires that organic cattle receive at least 30 percent of their dry matter intake from pasture during a grazing season that is at least 120 days long. UW-Madison researchers explored whether limitations on the inputs allowed in organic farming may result in differences in plant-soil dynamics compared to conventional dairy operations, necessitating different grazing techniques. They searched peer-reviewed scientific publications for evidence of differences between organic and conventional pastures and found relevant scientific literature to be scarce. Even when reviewing related articles outside of the Upper Midwest, mostly from New Zealand, the results were mixed.
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Education and Training

Academic Articles
  • Silva, E.M. and G. Muller. 2013. Creating a Collaborative, Hands-on Program to Teach High School Students Organic Farming, HortTechnology 23:376‐381.
  • Falk, C., E. Silva, and P. Pao. 2006. From the Classroom to the Community: An Integrated Method for Research and Teaching of Organic Production. Revista Mexicana de Agronegocios. 19:1-­‐16.  In English and Spanish.
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Entomology

Academic Articles
  • Bruner, L., D.J. Eakes, G.J. Keever, J.W. Baier, C. Stuart Whitman, P.R. Knight,  J.E. Altland, and E.M. Silva. 2008. Butterfly Feeding Preferences of Lantana camara Cultivars and Lantana montevidensis ‘Weeping Lavender’ in the Landscape and Nectar Characteristics.  Journal of Environmental Horticulture 26(1):9–18.
  • Silva, E.M., B. B. Dean, and L. K. Hiller. 2004. Patterns of floral nectar production of onion (Allium cepa L.) and the effects of environmental conditions. J. Am. Soc. Hort. Sci. 129: 299-­‐302.
  • Keller, Alexander & McFrederick, Quinn & Dharampal, Prarthana & Steffan, Shawn & Danforth, Bryan & Leonhardt, Sara. (2020). (More than) Hitchhikers through the network: The shared microbiome of bees and flowers. Current Opinion in Insect Science. 10.1016/j.cois.2020.09.007 (PDF)
  • Dharampal, Prarthana & Hetherington, Matthew & Steffan, Shawn. (2020). Microbes make the meal: oligolectic bees require microbes within their host pollen to thrive. Ecological Entomology. 45. 10.1111/een.12926. (PDF)
  • Foye, Shane & Steffan, Shawn. (2020). A Rare, Recently Discovered Nematode, Oscheius onirici (Rhabditida: Rhabditidae), Kills Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Within Fruit. Journal of economic entomology. 113. 10.1093/jee/toz365. (PDF)
  • Foye, Shane & Steffan, Shawn. (2019). Two native Wisconsin nematodes represent virulent biocontrol agents in cranberries. Biological Control. 138. 104042. 10.1016/j.biocontrol.2019.104042. (PDF)
  • Dharampal, Prarthana & Carlson, Caitlin & Currie, Cameron & Steffan, Shawn. (2019). Pollen-borne microbes shape bee fitness. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 286. 20182894. 10.1098/rspb.2018.2894. (PDF)
  • Steffan, Shawn & Singleton, Merritt & Draney, Michael & Chasen, Elissa & Johnson, Kyle. (2017). Arthropod Fauna Associated with Wild and Cultivated Cranberries in Wisconsin. Great Lakes Entomologist. 50. 98-110. (PDF)
  • Ye, Weimin & Foye, Shane & MacGuidwin, Ann & Steffan, Shawn. (2017). Incidence of Oscheius onirici (Nematoda: Rhabditidae), a potentially entomopathogenic nematode from the marshlands of Wisconsin, USA. Journal of Nematology. 50. 9-26. 10.21307/jofnem-2018-004.
  • Steffan, Shawn & Chasen, Elissa & Deutsch, Annie & Mafra-Neto, Agenor. (2017). Multi-Species Mating Disruption in Cranberries (Ericales: Ericaceae): Early Evidence Using a Flowable Emulsion. Journal of Insect Science. 17. 10.1093/jisesa/iex025.
  • Mills, Nicholas & Jones, Vincent & Baker, Callie & Melton, Tawnee & Steffan, Shawn & Unruh, Thomas & Horton, David & Shearer, Peter & Amarasekare, Kaushalya & Milickzy, Eugene. (2016). Using plant volatile traps to estimate the diversity of natural enemy communities in orchard ecosystems. Biological Control. 102. 10.1016/j.biocontrol.2016.05.001.
  • Steffan, Shawn & Chikaraishi, Yoshito & Horton, David & Miliczky, Eugene & Zalapa, Juan & Jones, Vincent & Ohkouchi, Naohiko. (2015). Beneficial or not? Decoding carnivore roles in plant protection. Biological Control. 91. 34-41. 10.1016/j.biocontrol.2015.07.002.
  • Deutsch, Annie & Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar & Kyryczenko-Roth, Vera & Sojka, Jayne & Zalapa, Juan & Steffan, Shawn. (2014). Degree-Day Benchmarks for Sparganothis sulfureana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Development in Cranberries. Journal of Economic Entomology. 107. 2130-2136. 10.1603/EC14261.
  • Jones, Vincent & Steffan, Shawn & Wiman, Nik & Horton, David & Miliczky, Eugene & Zhang, Qing-He & Baker, Callie. (2011). Evaluation of herbivore-induced plant volatiles for monitoring green lacewings in Washington apple orchards. Biological Control. 56. 98-105. 10.1016/j.biocontrol.2010.10.001.
  • Silva, E.M., B. B. Dean, and L.K. Hiller. 2003. Honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) foraging in response to pre-conditioning with onion flower scent compounds. J. Econ. Entomol. 96(5): 1510-1513.
  • Silva, E.M. and B. B. Dean. 2000. The effect of nectar composition and nectar concentration on honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) visitations to hybrid onion flowers. J. Econ. Entomol. 93(4): 1216-­‐1221.
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More beneficial insects through habitat enhancement (44 mins) Matt O’Neal, Iowa State University,YouTube video 2020 OGRAIN Conference

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Farmers Markets

Academic Articles
  • Trivette, S., Archambault, S., Morales, A. (2015). “Money Made at the Market: Sales at the Williamsburg Farmers Market – 2002-2014” Department of Urban and Regional Planning – Working Paper Series. (PDF)
  • Morales, Alfonso (2011). “Marketplaces: Prospects for Social, Economic, and Political Development” Journal of Planning Literature 26: 3 originally published online 11 February 2011 (PDF)
  • Morales, A. and Kettles, G (2009). “Healthy Food Outside: Farmers Markets, taco trucks, and sidewalk fruit vendors”. The Journal of Contemporary Health Law and Policy, Volume XXVI. (PDF)
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Other (Tools, presentations, networks, etc.)
  • Farm 2 Facts
    • Farm 2 Facts (F2F) is a farmers-market data collection toolkit backed by the University of Wisconsin-Madison. F2F assists farmers markets and market managers in aggregating, interpreting, and reporting data that they’re likely collecting already. F2F helps markets hone their decision-making, communicate with stakeholders, and secure funding. The F2F team has a one-on-one relationship with every customer, and develops  software based on client feedback.

Fertility

Academic Articles
  • West, J.R., M.D. Ruark, A.J. Bussan, J.B. Colquhoun, and E.M. Silva. 2016. Organic nutrient and weed management on loamy sand soil under sweet corn production. Agronomy Journal. 108:758-769. doi:10.2134/agronj2015.0393 
  • West, J.R. Nitrogen and weed management for organic sweet corn production on loamy sand. Agron. J. 108:758-769.
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Field Crops

Academic Articles
  • Silva, E.M. and L. Vereecke. 2019. Optimizing organic cover crop-based rotational tillage systems for early soybean growth. Organic Agriculture. Firstview 1-11.
  • Silva, E. M. and M. Tchamitchian. 2018. Long-term systems experiments and long-term agricultural research sites as tools in agroecological research and design. Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems. 42:1-9. 
  • Kissing-Kucek, L., Santantonio, N., Gauch, H.G, Dawson, J.C., Mallory, E.B., Darby, H.M., Sorrells, M.E. 2019. Genotype by environment interactions and stability in organic wheat. Crop Science 58:1 (2019) doi: 10.2135/cropsci2018.02.0147.
  • Kissing-Kucek, L., E. Dyck, J. Russell, L. Clark, J. Hamelman, S. Burns-Leader, S. Senders, J. Jones, D. Benscher, M. Davis, G. Roth, S. Zwinger, M.E. Sorrells and J.C. Dawson. 2017 Quality and sensory evaluation of northeastern wheats for artisanal bread, pasta and pastry. Journal of Cereal Science. 74: 19-27.
  • Dawson, J.C., Serpolay, E., Giuliano, S., Galic, N., Schermann, N., Chable, V., and Goldringer, I. 2012 Multi-trait evolution of farmer varieties of bread wheat after cultivation in contrasting organic farming systems in Europe. Genetica 140: 1-17. doi: 10.1007/s10709-012-9646-9
  • Dawson J.C., Huggins D.R., Jones S.S., 2008. Characterizing nitrogen use efficiency in natural and agricultural ecosystems to improve the performance of low input and organic agricultural systems. Field Crops Research 107: 89–101. doi: 10.1016/j.fcr.2008.01.001.
  • Dawson, J.C., Murphy, K.M. and Jones, S.S. 2012. On-farm breeding for small grains. Northern Grain Growers Association News. No 12: Summer 2012. St. Albans, VT
  • Hossard L, Archer DW, Bertrand M, Colnenne-David C, Debaeke P, Ernfors M, Jeuffroy MH, Munier-Jolain N, Nilsson C, Richard G, Sanford GR, Snapp SS, Jensen ES, Makowski D. 2016. A meta-analysis of maize and wheat yields in low-input vs. conventional and organic systems. Agronomy Journal. 108:1155–1167.
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  • Organic Grain Resource and Information Network (OGRAIN)
    • The Organic Grain Resource and Information Network (OGRAIN) is an educational framework for developing organic grain production in the upper Midwest. OGRAIN resources include virtual events, field days, annual winter and summer intensives, written resources, an organic grain Resource List, and series of educational videos. The OGRAIN website offers access to these resources and more at https://ograin.cals.wisc.edu/.
  • OGRAIN Compass
    • OGRAIN Compass is a new and unique tool in the Compass library. In contrast to Veggie Compass and Livestock Compass, which are “backward-looking” tools to evaluate financial outcomes from the previous season, OGRAIN Compass is a forward-looking tool to help grain producers examine the financial outcome of converting to certified organic production.
  • OGRAIN Community Map
    • The OGRAIN Community Map connects you to organic farmers, processors, seed houses, input suppliers, consultants, support businesses, mills, buyers and more involved with the organic grain industry in the Upper Midwest and beyond.
  • Organic Grain Resource List
    • From grain buyers to seed providers to organic certifiers, a comprehensive list of all of the relevant resources available to midwestern organic grain farmers

Financial

Academic Articles
  • Silva, E.M., R. Claypool, J. Munsch, J. Hendrickson, P. Mitchell, and J. Mills. 2014. Veggie Compass: A spreadsheet-based tool to calculate cost‐of‐production for diversified organic vegetable farmers.  HortTechnology 24:394-402.
  • Silva, E.M., F. Dong, P.D. Mitchell, and J. Hendrickson. 2014. Impact of marketing channels on perceptions of quality of life and profitability of Wisconsin’s organic vegetable farmers. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems. 30:428-438.
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  • Veggie Compass
    • Veggie Compass is a farm management tool for diversified fresh market vegetable growers. Using cost, sales and labor data, the spreadsheet calculates the cost of production for each crop and the profitability of each market channel (e.g., CSA, farmers market, wholesale, retail). For example, a grower can learn if broccoli sales are more lucrative at farmers markets or through wholesale distributors. The tool can also be used to predict the financial impact of different farm scenarios for the future and to assess a farm’s financial progress over time. Such information can help farmers locate their efficiencies, set prices based on actual costs of production, and increase farm profits.
  • Livestock Compass
    • We had many requests from Veggie Compass users who also raise livestock for a similar tool to help them measure the profitability of their meat and egg enterprises. Like Veggie Compass, this tool will be most beneficial for farmers who raise multiple species and who sell their products in multiple market channels…and who are trying to parse out which products and which markets are most profitable. Any livestock producer will find the tool useful, however. Dairy farmers will need to wait for our forthcoming Pasture-Based Dairy Compass tool.
  • OGRAIN Compass
    • OGRAIN Compass is a new and unique tool in the Compass library. In contrast to Veggie Compass and Livestock Compass, which are “backward-looking” tools to evaluate financial outcomes from the previous season, OGRAIN Compass is a forward-looking tool to help grain producers examine the financial outcome of converting to certified organic production.
  • Fruit and Nut Compass
    • The long awaited and much anticipated Fruit and Nut Compass will be available soon. We do not have an exact release date at the current time but it should be available sometime in March, 2021. This new Compass tool will be the most sophisticated yet. As a result, its development has been a challenge, to say the least.
  • Monthly Cash Flow Projection Template (excel) Compeer Financial

Fruit and Nut Crops

Academic Articles
  • Foye, Shane & Steffan, Shawn. (2020). A Rare, Recently Discovered Nematode, Oscheius onirici (Rhabditida: Rhabditidae), Kills Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Within Fruit. Journal of economic entomology. 113. 10.1093/jee/toz365. (PDF)
  • Foye, Shane & Steffan, Shawn. (2019). Two native Wisconsin nematodes represent virulent biocontrol agents in cranberries. Biological Control. 138. 104042. 10.1016/j.biocontrol.2019.104042. (PDF)
  • Steffan, Shawn & Singleton, Merritt & Draney, Michael & Chasen, Elissa & Johnson, Kyle. (2017). Arthropod Fauna Associated with Wild and Cultivated Cranberries in Wisconsin. Great Lakes Entomologist. 50. 98-110. (PDF)
  • Ye, Weimin & Foye, Shane & MacGuidwin, Ann & Steffan, Shawn. (2017). Incidence of Oscheius onirici (Nematoda: Rhabditidae), a potentially entomopathogenic nematode from the marshlands of Wisconsin, USA. Journal of Nematology. 50. 9-26. 10.21307/jofnem-2018-004.
  • Steffan, Shawn & Chasen, Elissa & Deutsch, Annie & Mafra-Neto, Agenor. (2017). Multi-Species Mating Disruption in Cranberries (Ericales: Ericaceae): Early Evidence Using a Flowable Emulsion. Journal of Insect Science. 17. 10.1093/jisesa/iex025.
  • Mills, Nicholas & Jones, Vincent & Baker, Callie & Melton, Tawnee & Steffan, Shawn & Unruh, Thomas & Horton, David & Shearer, Peter & Amarasekare, Kaushalya & Milickzy, Eugene. (2016). Using plant volatile traps to estimate the diversity of natural enemy communities in orchard ecosystems. Biological Control. 102. 10.1016/j.biocontrol.2016.05.001.
  • Deutsch, Annie & Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar & Kyryczenko-Roth, Vera & Sojka, Jayne & Zalapa, Juan & Steffan, Shawn. (2014). Degree-Day Benchmarks for Sparganothis sulfureana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Development in Cranberries. Journal of Economic Entomology. 107. 2130-2136. 10.1603/EC14261.
  • Jones, Vincent & Steffan, Shawn & Wiman, Nik & Horton, David & Miliczky, Eugene & Zhang, Qing-He & Baker, Callie. (2011). Evaluation of herbivore-induced plant volatiles for monitoring green lacewings in Washington apple orchards. Biological Control. 56. 98-105. 10.1016/j.biocontrol.2010.10.001.
  • Bradford L. Barham, Mercedez Callenes, Seth Gitter, Jessa Lewis, and Jeremy Weber, “Fair Trade/Organic Coffee, Rural Livelihoods, and the ‘Agrarian Question’: Southern Mexican Coffee Farmers in Transition,” World Development, 39, 1 (2011): 134-145.
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  • Growing Midwestern Tree Nut Businesses: Five Case Studies
    • In order to address some of the challenges of forming a business for aggregating, processing and marketing tree nuts, the UW-Madison Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems (CIAS) conducted case study research of five midwestern tree nut businesses. The core activity of all of these businesses is to process a raw product—nuts in the shell—into a ready-to-eat food. The businesses in this study are based in Missouri, Michigan, Nebraska and Iowa, and the nuts they process include Chinese and hybrid chestnuts, black walnuts and pecans. Business structures include two cooperatives, a family corporation and two limited liability companies (LLCs).
  • Overview of Organic Cranberry Production
    • Organic cranberries are produced across the continent, with over 100 acres grown in Wisconsin. The major problems facing organic cranberry growers include weeds, insect pests, fruit rot and other fruit quality issues; but most significant is a 50% or more reduction in yield compared to conventional production. There is room for the organic cranberry market to expand, yet many growers who have tried it have given up because the price could not make up for the yield loss and costs associated with organic production. Research into improved fertilization techniques and varieties better suited to organic production could overcome the yield drop and improve the economic feasibility of organic production.
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Other (Tools, presentations, networks, etc.)
  • Fruit and Nut Compass
    • The long awaited and much anticipated Fruit and Nut Compass will be available soon. We do not have an exact release date at the current time but it should be available sometime in March, 2021. This new Compass tool will be the most sophisticated yet. As a result, its development has been a challenge, to say the least. This tool marks a departure of sorts from the Veggie and Livestock Compass tools. Those tools were built as “backward-looking” analytical tools. They provide a structure to enter data from a previous year and help a producer identify those products and markets that are profitable…and which are not. Veggie and Livestock Compass can then be used to identify solutions to make products or markets more profitable by cutting costs, raising prices, increasing yields, etc.

Marketing

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  • Contracting Tips Jody Padgham, OGRAIN, 2018
    • Quick tip guide for organic organic grain farmers
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Livestock

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Other (Tools, presentations, networks, etc.)
  • Livestock Compass
    • We had many requests from Veggie Compass users who also raise livestock for a similar tool to help them measure the profitability of their meat and egg enterprises. Like Veggie Compass, this tool will be most beneficial for farmers who raise multiple species and who sell their products in multiple market channels…and who are trying to parse out which products and which markets are most profitable. Any livestock producer will find the tool useful, however. Dairy farmers will need to wait for our forthcoming Pasture-Based Dairy Compass tool.
  • Integrating Livestock Into Cash Grain Jack Erisman,Goldmine Farm  (pdf file of 2018 OGRAIN Winter Conference powerpoint presentation)

No-till

Academic Articles
  • Silva, E.M. and K. Delate. 2017. A decade of progress in organic cover crop-based reduced tillage practices in the Upper Midwestern USA. Agriculture. 7:44.
  • Silva, E.M. and L. Vereecke. 2019. Optimizing organic cover crop-based rotational tillage systems for early soybean growth. Organic Agriculture. Firstview 1-11.
  • Vincent-Caboud, L., J. Peigné, M. Casagrande, and E.M. Silva. 2017. Overview of organic cover crop – based no tillage technique in Europe: Farmers’ practices and research challenges. Agriculture. Agriculture. 7:42.
  • Bietila, E., E.M Silva, A. Pfeiffer, and J. Colquhoun. 2016.  Cover Crop-based No-Till Production Impacts Potato, Bell Pepper, and Snap Bean Production in Wisconsin. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems. 32:349-357.
  • Silva, E.M. 2014. Management of five fall-sown cover crops for organic no-till production in the Upper Midwest. Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems. 38:748-763.
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Plant Breeding

Academic Articles
  • Lyon, A., E.M. Silva, M. Bell, and J. Zystro. 2015. Seed and Plant Breeding for Wisconsin’s Organic Vegetable Sector: Understanding Farmers’ Needs and Practices. Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems. 39:601-624.
  • De Oliveira Y, Burlot L, Dawson JC, Goldringer, I, Darkawi Madi, D, Rivire, P, Steinbach, D, van Frank G, and Thomas, M. 2020. SHiNeMaS: a web tool dedicated to seed lots history, phenotyping and cultural practices. Plant Methods. 2020;16(1). doi:10.1186/s13007-020-00640-2
  • Corak, K.E., Ellison, S.L., Simon, P.W., Spooner, D.M. and Dawson, J.C. 2019. Comparison of representative and custom methods of generating core subsets of a carrot (Daucus carota) germplasm collection. Crop Science 59:1107-1121. doi: 10.2135/cropsci2018.09.0602.
  • Healy, G.K. and J.C. Dawson. 2019. Plant breeding and social change: Perspectives from the Seed to Kitchen collaborative. Agriculture, Food and Human Value. DOI: 10.1007/s10460-019-09973-8
  • Zystro, J. Colley, M. and Dawson. J.C. 2019. Alternative Experimental Designs for Plant Breeding. Plant Breeding Reviews 42: 87-117
  • Kissing-Kucek, L., Santantonio, N., Gauch, H.G, Dawson, J.C., Mallory, E.B., Darby, H.M., Sorrells, M.E. 2019. Genotype by environment interactions and stability in organic wheat. Crop Science 58:1 (2019) doi: 10.2135/cropsci2018.02.0147.
  • Ellison, S.L.*, Luby, C.H.*, Corak, K.E.*, Coe, K., Senalik, D., Iorizzo, M., Goldman, I.L., Simon, P.W., Dawson, J.C. 2018. Carotenoid Presence Is Associated with the Or Gene in Domesticated Carrot. Genetics 210:1497-1508. https://doi.org/10.1534/genetics.118.301299. Selected for the cover of the December 2018 issue. *These authors contributed equally to the publication
  • Dawson, J.C. and Healy, G.K. 2018. Flavor Evaluation for Plant Breeders. Plant Breeding Reviews 41: 215-262.
  • Kissing-Kucek, L., Santantonio, N., Gauch, H.G, Dawson, J.C., Mallory, E.B., Darby, H.M., Sorrells, M.E. 2018. Genotype by environment interactions and stability in organic wheat. Crop Science. First look August 28th. DOI: 10.2135/cropsci2018.02.0147.
  • Dawson, J.C., Moore V.M. and Tracy, W.F. 2018. Establishing Best Practices for Germplasm Exchange, Intellectual Property Rights, and Revenue Return to Sustain Public Cultivar Development. Crop Science 58: 469-471.
  • Kissing-Kucek, L., E. Dyck, J. Russell, L. Clark, J. Hamelman, S. Burns-Leader, S. Senders, J. Jones, D. Benscher, M. Davis, G. Roth, S. Zwinger, M.E. Sorrells and J.C. Dawson. 2017 Quality and sensory evaluation of northeastern wheats for artisanal bread, pasta and pastry. Journal of Cereal Science. 74: 19-27.
  • Luby, C.H., Dawson, J.C. and Goldman, I. 2016 Assessment and Accessibility of Phenotypic and Genotypic Diversity of Carrot (Daucus carota L. var. sativus) Cultivars Commercially Available in the United States. PLOS One DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0167865
  • Jansky, S.H., Dawson, J.C., Spooner, D.M. 2015. How do we address the disconnect between genetic and morphological diversity in germplasm collections? American Journal of Botany. 102(8): 1213–1215.
  • Rivière, P., Dawson, J.C., Goldringer, I., David, O. 2015. Hierarchical Bayesian modeling for flexible experiments in decentralized participatory plant breeding. Crop Science 55:1–15
  • Chable, V., Dawson, J.C., Bocci R., and Goldringer, I. 2014. Seeds for Organic Agriculture: Development of Participatory Plant Breeding and Farmers’ Networks in France. Chapter 21 in S. Bellon, S. Penvern (eds.), Organic Farming, Prototype for Sustainable Agricultures, 383pp. DOI 10.1007/978-94-007-7927-3_21, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.
  • Dawson, J.C., Jeffrey B. Endelman, Nicolas Heslot, José Crossa, Jesse Poland, Susanne Dreisigacker, Yann Manès, Mark E. Sorrells, Jean-Luc Jannink. 2013.  The use of unbalanced historical data for genomic selection in an international wheat breeding program. Field Crops Research. 154 (2013) 12–22. doi: 10.1016/j.fcr.2013.07.020.
  • Rivière, P., Goldringer, I., Berthellot, J.-F., Galic, N., Jouanne-Pin, S., DeKochko, P. and Dawson, J.C.,  2013. Response to farmer mass selection in early generation progeny of bread wheat landrace crosses. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems. 30: 190-201 doi:10.1017/S1742170513000343.
  • Dawson, J.C., Rivière, P., Berthellot, J.-F., Mercier, F., De Kochko, P., Galic, N., Pin, S., Serpolay, E., Thomas, M., Giuliano, S. and Goldringer, I. 2011. Collaborative plant breeding for organic agricultural systems in developed countries. Sustainability 3: 1206-1223 doi:10.3390/su3081206
  • Serpolay, E., Dawson, J.C., Chable, V., Lammerts Van Bueren, E.T., Osman, A., Pino, S., Silveri, D. and Goldringer, I. 2011. Diversity of different farmer and modern wheat varieties cultivated in contrasting organic farming conditions in western Europe and implications for European seed and variety legislation. Organic Agriculture, 1, 127-145 doi: 10.1007/s13165-011-0011-6.
  • Dawson, J.C., Murphy, K.M., Huggins, D.R. and Jones, S.S. 2011. Comparison of winter wheat genotypes selected under different nitrogen regimes for traits related to nitrogen use in an organic system. Organic Agriculture 1(2): 65-80. doi: 10.1007/s13165-011-0006-3.
  • Dawson J.C., Goldberger J., 2008. Assessing farmer interest in participatory plant breeding: Who wants to work with scientists? Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems 23: 177-187. doi: 10.1017/S1742170507002141.
  • Dawson, J.C., Murphy, K.M. and Jones, S.S. 2012. On-farm breeding for small grains. Northern Grain Growers Association News. No 12: Summer 2012. St. Albans, VT
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  • Organic Vegetable Trials and Plant Breeding Needs Assessment and Strategy for National Collaboration
    • In 2016 Julie Dawson at University of Wisconsin, Madison, Jim Myers at Oregon State University and Micaela Colley at Organic Seed Alliance wrote a grant to do an organic vegetable grower survey and a series of interviews with plant breeders and seed companies to better understand gaps in organic cultivar development, breeding priorities for im-portant crops and stakeholders’ visions for how a national trialing network could function. Responses to the surveys and interviews were compared to findings from previous meetings on similar topics held in the Pacific Northwest, Northeast, and Upper Midwest, to yield a more nuanced understanding of gaps in organic plant breeding and poten-tial for multi-regional collaboration in the future.The intent of this report is to summarize the survey and interview findings, and collate them with the findings of regional work focused on the Northeast, Midwest and Pacific Northwest. This report also summarizes the discussion from the summit, including suggested next steps for the organic vegetable breeding community. 
  • The Grower’s Guide to Conducting On-Farm Variety Trials
    • On-farm variety trials help farmers manage risk by identifying optimal genetics for a grower’s unique environmental and market conditions. This guide provides farmers fundamental skills to conduct on-farm variety trials that reflect their particular goals and farming operations. Readers will find scientific principles presented in an accessible way, and will be walked though the process of planning, implementing, evaluating, and interpreting a variety trial. This tool is useful for farmers, as well as for research, extension, and non-profit programs looking to train farmers as co-researchers when conducting on-farm trials.
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Reports

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  • Organic Agriculture in Wisconsin: 2017 Status Report
    • Thank you for your interest in the Organic Agriculture in Wisconsin: 2017 Status Report. This report provides details about trends, challenges and opportunities in organic agriculture. We hope that you will share our excitement for the growth potential and innovation in this sector of Wisconsin’s vibrant agricultural industry.
  • Organic agriculture in Wisconsin: 2015 status report
    • Organic Agriculture in Wisconsin: 2015 Status Report provides data on organic production, markets and farmer demographics. This report also includes a special section on organic grain, including possible strategies to increase organic grain production in our state.
  • Organic Agriculture in Wisconsin: 2014 UW-Madison Research Report
    • Organic agriculture research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is the focus of a new report published by the UW-Madison Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems (CIAS) and the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection. This report summarizes 23 studies conducted by researchers in the university’s College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (CALS) in partnership with farmers across the state. Those studies look at production practices for the state’s main agricultural products as well as farm management and marketing.
  • Organic agriculture in Wisconsin: 2012 Status Report
    • Wisconsin boasts the second largest number of organic farms in the U.S., ranks first among the states for the number of organic dairy and beef farms, and is third in the nation for organic vegetable farms. Organic Agriculture in Wisconsin: 2012 Status Report provides a wealth of information on the opportunities and challenges facing Wisconsin’s organic farms and processors.
  • Organic Agriculture in Wisconsin: 2007 Status Report
    • Wisconsin is well positioned to reap the benefits sown by our organic farmers, processors and other businesses. With continued support for and investment in organics, Wisconsin will remain a leader in organic agriculture. With a focus on organic dairy, this report describes production, processing and economic issues in organic agriculture. It also includes farm profiles, an update on the Wisconsin Organic Advisory Council, organic research projects at UW-Madison, and a list of resources and organizations for the organic industry.
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Plant Pathology

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Management of diseases and mycotoxins in organic crop rotations (59 mins.) Gary Bergstrom, Cornell University. YouTube video 2019 OGRAIN Conference.

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Regional Food Systems

Academic Articles
  • Morales, A. and Farnsworth, L. (2009). Satiating the Demand: Planning for alternative models of regional food distribution. Department of Urban and Regional Planning – Working Paper Series, 09-1, October. (PDF)
  • Morales, A. and Loker, A. (2014). “Welcome to the Club! Food buying co-ops have potential to help increase food security for many”. Rural Cooperatives, January/February. (PDF)
  • Skipper, Lihlani and Morales, Alfonso (2014). “The Right Blend: Fifth Season’s vegetable mixes help scale-up Wisconsin farm-to-school marketing program”. Rural Cooperatives, May/June (PDF)
  • Lamine, C. and J.C. Dawson. 2018. The Agroecology of Food Systems: Reconnecting Agriculture, Food, and the Environment.  Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems 42: 629-636, DOI: 10.1080/21683565.2018.1432517
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  • Values-based food supply chain case study: Full Circle
    • Full Circle is an organic farm to table delivery service based in western Washington that grows, sources and distributes fresh produce to West Coast communities on a subscription basis. Full Circle delivers produce from California to Alaska and employs more than 250 people. Their original network of Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) members and farmers’ market and restaurant customers has grown to over 16,500 regular customers in four states. Products are sourced from 430 acres of certified organic land on the Full Circle Farm in Carnation, Washington, as well as from an expanding network of organic farms and distributors and artisan food producers from different growing regions.
  • Values-based food supply chain case study: Home Grown Wisconsin Co-op
    • Home Grown Wisconsin was a cooperative, multi-farm wholesale and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) food business founded in 1996 in south central Wisconsin. Home Grown Wisconsin successfully sold fresh produce to upscale restaurants and CSA customers in the Chicago area for more than 10 years. In 2009, after being significantly impacted by floods, a downturn in the economy and mounting overhead costs, the cooperative tried to shift to a 100 percent CSA business model. Unable to subscribe sufficient CSA members in the Chicago area that year, they could not cash flow the enterprise. In the spring of 2009, Home Grown Wisconsin closed its business operations and transferred its assets to a newly formed business that folded after several years of operation. The core farmers of Home Grown Wisconsin continue to farm and market their products, and several of them have been quite successful. While this case does not provide detailed information about the logistics and economics of Home Grown Wisconsin, it does illustrate some of the opportunities and challenges, internal and external, confronted by a small-scale, farmer-owned marketing cooperative.
  • Values-based food supply chain case study: Organic Valley
    • In 1988, a small group of organic vegetable growers in Wisconsin formed a cooperative to provide stable and fair prices to its members. With the addition of dairy farmer members and an explosion of consumer interest in organic dairy products, the dairy segment of the co-op grew rapidly. It evolved into Organic Valley, the largest organic, farmer-owned cooperative in North America. As of 2011, Organic Valley has over 1,600 total members in 34 states and the Canadian province of Ontario and more than $600 million in gross sales. Beyond providing economic stability to its members, Organic Valley seeks to achieve ambitious goals regarding ecological and economic sustainability, diversity, energy conservation, food quality and advancement of cooperative principles.
  • Values-based food supply chain case study: Co-op Partners Warehouse
    • Co-op Partners Warehouse was established in 1999 by the Wedge Natural Foods Co-op in Minneapolis, Minnesota. This certified organic wholesale distribution warehouse serves retail stores, food service businesses and buying clubs throughout the Upper Midwest. It is an important link between customers and suppliers of local produce, dairy products and other perishable foods. Because it is wholly owned by the Wedge, Co-op Partners Warehouse carries out the goals and vision of Wedge co-op members. In addition to seeking out efficiencies in sourcing, warehousing and distribution, Co-op Partners Warehouse takes a special interest in fostering markets for smaller scale growers.
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Soil Health

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Urban Farming

Academic Articles
  • Covert, Matt and Morales, Alfonso (2014). “Formalizing City Farms: Conflict and Conciliation” from “The Informal American City: Beyond Taco Trucks and Day Labor” The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA. (PDF)
  • Pfeiffer, A.C., E.M. Silva, and J. Colquhoun. 2015. Living Mulch Cover Crops on Small Parcels for Weed Control in Urban and Small-Scale Applications. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems. 31:309-317.
  • Pfeiffer, A., E. Silva, and J. Colquhoun. 2014. Innovation in urban agricultural practices: responding to diverse production environments. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems. 29:1-14.
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Vegetable Crops

Academic Articles
  • Weil, R., E.M. Silva, J. Hendrickson, and P.D. Mitchell. 2017. Time and technique studies for assessing labor productivity on diversified organic vegetable farms. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development. 7:129-148.
  • Silva, E.M. and V.M. Moore. 2017. Cover Crops as an Agroecological Practice on Organic Vegetable Farms in Wisconsin, USA. Sustainability. 9:55-70.
  • Silva, E.M., J. Hendrickson, P.D. Mitchell, and E. Bietila. 2016. From the Field: A Participatory Approach to Assess Labor Inputs on Organic Diversified Vegetable Farms in the Upper Midwestern United States. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems. Firstview 1-6.
  • Moore. V.M., P.D. Mitchell, and E.M. Silva. 2016. Cover Crop Adoption and Intensity on Wisconsin’s Organic Vegetable Farms. Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems. 40:693-713.
  • Bietila, E., E.M Silva, A. Pfeiffer, and J. Colquhoun. 2016.  Cover Crop-based No-Till Production Impacts Potato, Bell Pepper, and Snap Bean Production in Wisconsin. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems. 32:349-357.
  • West, J.R., M.D. Ruark, A.J. Bussan, J.B. Colquhoun, and E.M. Silva. 2016. Organic nutrient and weed management on loamy sand soil under sweet corn production. Agronomy Journal. 108:758-769. doi:10.2134/agronj2015.0393
  • Pfeiffer, A.C., E.M. Silva, and J. Colquhoun. 2015. Living Mulch Cover Crops on Small Parcels for Weed Control in Urban and Small-Scale Applications. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems. 31:309-317.
  • Lyon, A., E.M. Silva, M. Bell, and J. Zystro. 2015. Seed and Plant Breeding for Wisconsin’s Organic Vegetable Sector: Understanding Farmers’ Needs and Practices. Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems. 39:601-624.
  • Silva, E.M., F. Dong, P.D. Mitchell, and J. Hendrickson. 2014. Impact of marketing channels on perceptions of quality of life and profitability of Wisconsin’s organic vegetable farmers. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems. 30:428-438.
  • Healy, G.K., B.J. Emerson and Dawson, J.C. 2017 Comparing tomato varieties for productivity and quality under organic hoop-house and open-field management. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems. DOI 10.1017/S174217051600048X
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  • Food Safety Bites
    • Food Safety Bites is a series of short podcasts covering practical food safety practices for farmers and farmworkers. We encourage you to review the entire series for full understanding of these complex issues.
  • Veggiecompass.com
    • Compass Tools are free downloadable spreadsheets created at the Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems, University of Wisconsin-Madison. These tools help farmers actively manage for increased farm profits by helping them understand their cost of production, by product and by market channel. This enables farmers to make strategic decisions to adjust prices, reduce costs, shift market channel focus, reduce or drop unprofitable products, and expand production of their most profitable ventures.
  • Seed-to-Kitchen Collaborative 
    • The Seed to Kitchen Collaborative connects plant breeders focused on organic systems to Wisconsin farmers and chefs, to create delicious, well-adapted vegetable varieties for local organic production. This collaboration presents a unique opportunity to focus on vegetable variety characteristics important to local food systems, such as flavor, fresh-market quality and agronomic performance on smaller-scale diversified farms.

Variety Trials

Academic Articles
  • Lyon, A.H., W.F. Tracy, J. Zystro, and E.M. Silva. 2019. Using adaptability analysis in a participatory variety trial of organic vegetable crops. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems. Firstview 1-17.
  • Healy, G.K., B.J. Emerson and Dawson, J.C. 2017 Comparing tomato varieties for productivity and quality under organic hoop-house and open-field management. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems. DOI 10.1017/S174217051600048X
  • Kissing-Kucek, L., E. Dyck, J. Russell, L. Clark, J. Hamelman, S. Burns-Leader, S. Senders, J. Jones, D. Benscher, M. Davis, G. Roth, S. Zwinger, M.E. Sorrells and J.C. Dawson. 2017 Quality and sensory evaluation of northeastern wheats for artisanal bread, pasta and pastry. Journal of Cereal Science. 74: 19-27.
  • Dawson, J.C., Serpolay, E., Giuliano, S., Galic, N., Schermann, N., Chable, V., and Goldringer, I. 2012 Multi-trait evolution of farmer varieties of bread wheat after cultivation in contrasting organic farming systems in Europe. Genetica 140: 1-17. doi: 10.1007/s10709-012-9646-9
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  • The Seed-to-Kitchen Management Sheet
    • This sheet allows growers to keep track of how they manage each trial, or each block of a trial. This is especially important for trails spanning multiple years.
  • The Grower’s Guide to Conducting On-Farm Variety Trials
    • On-farm variety trials help farmers manage risk by identifying optimal genetics for a grower’s unique environmental and market conditions. This guide provides farmers fundamental skills to conduct on-farm variety trials that reflect their particular goals and farming operations. Readers will find scientific principles presented in an accessible way, and will be walked though the process of planning, implementing, evaluating, and interpreting a variety trial. This tool is useful for farmers, as well as for research, extension, and non-profit programs looking to train farmers as co-researchers when conducting on-farm trials.
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  • On Farm Variety Trials: Toolkit for risk management of organic and specialty crop producers
    • The goal of this two-part webinar series is to provide horticultural crop and small grain growers with the skills and information necessary to conduct effective on-farm trials, and how to manage risk in crop variety and seed sourcing decisions. These webinars include updated methods for conducting simple on-farm trials, new perspectives from organic certifiers, and an introduction to a new, user-friendly online tool that helps growers manage and evaluate variety trial data. The webinar series is open to everyone but most appropriate for growers with at least two seasons of production experience. Prior to the webinar, participants are encouraged to review the newly published The Grower’s Guide to Conducting On-farm Variety Trials, which is available for free download at the link below on this page.
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Weed Control

Academic Articles
  • West, J.R., M.D. Ruark, A.J. Bussan, J.B. Colquhoun, and E.M. Silva. 2016. Organic nutrient and weed management on loamy sand soil under sweet corn production. Agronomy Journal. 108:758-769. doi:10.2134/agronj2015.0393
  • Pfeiffer, A.C., E.M. Silva, and J. Colquhoun. 2015. Living Mulch Cover Crops on Small Parcels for Weed Control in Urban and Small-Scale Applications. Renewable Agriculture and Food Systems. 31:309-317.
  • West, J.R. Nitrogen and weed management for organic sweet corn production on loamy sand. Agron. J. 108:758-769.
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